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Meet Amazing Americans U.S. Presidents James Madison
 
The Federalist
"The Federalist" - exhibit of the first bound copy

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James Madison's Contribution to the Constitution
In order for the Constitution to become the law by which all Americans abided, two-thirds of the 13 states had to ratify (approve) it individually, and it was sent to them for this purpose on September 28. Madison campaigned for the ratification of the Constitution by co-authoring a series of essays with John Jay and Alexander Hamilton that appeared in various New York newspapers and then circulated around the states. There were 85 essays in all (Madison wrote 29), and they were known as the Federalist Papers.

Madison's important contribution to the overall creation of the Constitution earned him the nickname "Father of the Constitution" later in life. On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify the new Constitution, and that was enough to make the Constitution the law of the land. But that wasn't all. ... Madison went on to strengthen the Constitution even further. Do you know how?

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