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John Smith Memorial, Richmond, Virginia
With his writings, his stories and the John Smith Memorial in Richmond, Virginia, Smith is still honored and remembered

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John Smith Became a Leader of Jamestown
September 10, 1608

Smith claimed that, while fighting in Transylvania, Hungary, against the Turks in 1600, he had been wounded, captured, and sold into slavery in Turkey. Smith said that a Turkish woman had fallen in love with him and helped him escape. Whether that is a "tall tale" or not, his most famous Jamestown experience, equally as romantic and daring, has become a legendary story in American history. Captured and brought before Algonquin Chief Powhatan in December 1607, Pocahontas, the chief's young daughter, supposedly saved Smith's life by throwing herself between him and his would-be executioners.

In the summer of 1608, Jamestown prospered. Smith was injured in a gunpowder accident in 1609 and was forced to return to England. Returning in 1614, he dubbed the region to the north of Virginia, New England. Do you think Smith's stories are true? You might want to read more of Captain Smith's adventures in his book, Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles, published in 1624.

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