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Jump Back in Time Gilded Age (1878-1889)
 
Taking the time, Brooklyn Navy Yard
Navy Yard officials set a clock to the official time in Brooklyn, New York

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Four Standard Time Zones for the Continental U.S. Were Introduced
November 18, 1883

At first the railroad managers tried to address the problem by establishing 100 different railroad time zones. With so many time zones, different railroad lines were sometimes on different time systems, and scheduling remained confusing and uncertain.

Finally, the railway managers agreed to use four time zones for the continental United States: Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific. Local times would no longer be used by the railroads. The U.S. Naval Observatory, responsible for establishing the official time in the United States, agreed to make the change. At 12 noon on November 18, 1883, the U.S. Naval Observatory began signaling the change.

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